Anarchists and other activists on trial in Brest (video)


Brest anarchists who led the non-parasite march several days ago now face trials behind closed doors. In the context of pseudo-liberalization and the supposedly warming relations with the West, the preparation (preventive detention) and the authorities’ reaction to the rally in Brest were particularly tough. But protests now emerge in other cities, too.

The court of Leninski district of Brest started the week putting on trial those who had taken the liberty to protest against the economic policy in Belarus.

Andrei Sharenda was detained already on Friday

The activist spent the weekend in the local police department. The next day he was punished by a fine of BYN 575 rubles.

“I spent three days in the cell in awful conditions…I think it was some mockery over human nature,” said Sharenda.

Another participant of the protests – Natalia Papkova – was released from detention

On March 3rd, she was forcefully, allegedly at the request of the neighbors, placed in a psychiatric hospital. Yesterday, without explanation, without inquiries and examinations, she was released.

“I think I was detained only in order not to allow me to protest on the fifth of March in Brest against the decree on parasitism,” said the activist.

Five anarchists were punished for protests.

For participation in the protests were tried Andrei Dzenyushkin, Ruslan Khalikau, Alyaksandr Kazlyanka, Pavel Zavadski and Zmitser Leuchuk. The anarchists were detained by plainclothes police when the young people were returning home.

 

Fate of Alyaksandr Kabanau from Byaroza remains unknown.

The public activist became remembered by his speeches during the previous protests in Brest on February 26th.

On the eve of the protest, Alyaksandr was detained by police, of which he had reported on the social networks.

“Belsat” saves anarchists.

A non-parasite march was held in Brest a few days ago. About 15 anarchists were able to lead the rest of the rally. The young people even blocked the avenue for 40 seconds.

Yuras Salodki, spring96.org

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