In the run-up of Putin’s visit: Lukashenka comes out flat for Belarus’s independence


Before the Russian President’s arrival in Minsk Aliaksandr Lukashenka addressed to the Belarusian people in the titular ethnic group. The leader hasn’t made such long speeches in Belarusian since the 90s, political analyst Aliaksandr Klaskouski stressed.

Of course, sometimes Mr Lukashenka put Belarusian words in his Russian-language harangues but he just wanted to tease his political opponents advocating Belarusianness, the expert said.

But this time President Lukashenka delivered a pompous speech in Belarusian at the solemn meeting held on July, 1 to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the country’s liberation from the Nazi invaders and Belarus Independence Day. He put an emphasis on ‘Belarusian freedom and today’s independence’

Russia’s ease in the annexation of Crimea could not but scare the leader of the state that is dependent from its eastern neighbour and populated by Russianised people, Mr Klaskouski stated.

{movie}In the run-up of Putin’s visit: Lukashenka comes out flat for Belarus’s independence (in Belarusian)|right|17242{/movie}

“We have been told scary stories that armies will come from the East and invade us. In the East they say that hordes will come from the West and destroy us. As President I must bear all this mind. I cannot neglect any possibilities, even the most absurd ones,” state-owned news agency BelTA quotes him as saying.

After that Mr Lukashenka assured the people that nobody and nothing would bring Belarusians to their knees – except for economic reasons. “But I have always said that no hordes can destroy our country today. If there is any threat to the independence of our country, it can be caused by economic problems only,” the head of state stressed.

Today Russia’s President Vladimir Putin is due to participate in the celebrations on the occasion of the 70th anniversary of the country’s liberation from German invaders. Mr Putin is sure to take all advantages of the feast, show Russians that they have allies and seal pro-Russian sentiments in Belarusians’ public opinion, Aliaksandr Klaskouski believes.

www.belsat.eu/en

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